Growing potatoes in reusable shopping bags


I was chatting with my friend Amy awhile back, and she expressed a curiosity about growing potatoes in a grow bag. Of course, curiosity is contagious so I had to do a little research of my own. What I found out was that potato grow bags were a little pricey, to me anyway. So I researched a little more. Didn’t want to use garbage bags or trash cans or tires. Then I realized that I could use landscaping cloth and sew up a few, but I didn’t need to buy as much as was in the package, not for an experiment. If I spent that much I might as well buy the grow bag! So I hit on maybe using my reusable HyVee grocery bag, its black and approximately the same dimensions, just square not round, but its porous! And only cost $.99!

So, off to Earl May garden store, picked up 6 seed potatoes, on sale.

Folded down the sides at least 4 inches, filled with soil, and planted 7 “eyes” of my potatoes.

Covered them with 3″ of soil, and watered thoroughly.

We’ll see how this goes, I planted so many in each bag so in case a few questionable “eyes” don’t open.

When the plants are 8″ tall, I will add more soil, then add more again when there’s another 8″ of growth.



  1. Hey, what happened with this? Did it work?

  2. It did work in spite of my serious neglect!! One thing I have found is you have to moniter and water more often. I think when I do this again, I will add more moisture holding materials, it did dry out more than I though it would. But, it worked! And it was organic through neglect!

  3. If the bag were above the soil line, like in the pics, it could have resulted in a “wicking” effect and dried your “sack of potatoes” out that way. I like this idea and may give it a go. I have also seen discarded sweaters (I’m thinking sweatshirts) sewn up and used as hanging plant bags, don’t know why you couldn’t plant them in the ground.

  4. Don’t use reusable grocery bags to grow food! I thought it was a great ideal until I came across this study of high lead content in these bags. Spending extra money for a grow bag makes sense in light of this research.

    http://www.consumerfreedom.com/downloads/ccf_bag_report.pdf