All posts by Kate D

Iowa Food Cooperative’s Open House in Ames

The Iowa Food Cooperative is excited to announce our open house on February 28th from 4:30-5:30P in the community room at Wheatsfield Cooperative! We will have local food samples and a raffle for a $25 Iowa Food Cooperative gift certificate. We look forward to seeing you. Help us spread the word and share our event.

What is the Iowa Food Cooperative?
-We are a dedicated group that facilitates connections between Iowa producers of food and Iowa consumers of food (You!).
-We care about the local food community and building relationships between farmers and consumers. We believe it is important to understand how the food that nourishes you is produced. The cooperative supports farmers who use sustainable practices in order to improve our water and soil quality along with supporting ecosystems for our pollinators.

How does the Iowa Food Cooperative work?
-The co-op operates a year-round online farmers’ market. Our members (we have a 6 month free trial membership) place orders online every two weeks; our producers deliver the goods to our main site in Des Moines. From there our volunteers sort orders and pack the goods to go out to our satellite locations. Ames customers pick up their order on Fridays from 4:30-5:30P at Wheatsfield Grocery.

Visit our open house to sign-up + learn more about what makes the Iowa Food Cooperative the best source for local food.

The Bird is The Word–Rotisserie Style Chicken at Home

The Bird is The Word–Rotisserie Style Chicken at Home

How many times has someone promised you a juicy baked chicken recipe only to leave you with a dry bird that’s reminiscent of the turkey scene from ‘National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation?’ I super, duper promise this recipe will not leave you needing a vat of gravy to add moisture to your meal. How you ask? Because we’re going to spatchcock that bird! By spatchcocking you lessen the roasting time needed to cook your chicken, which means the breast doesn’t dry out while waiting for the thighs to cook through. Not only is it an easy technique, but this simple recipe delivers so much flavor that you’ll be wanting to put it into your regular menu rotation.

Ingredients

  • 1 3.5 to 5 lb whole chicken
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • 1 1/2 TB BRAISED Bone Broth Chaga-Thyme Seasoning
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 TB coarse ground salt such as kosher salt
  • 2 TB olive oil

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees, or air fryer to 375 degrees.
  • In a small bowl, combine all seasonings with the olive oil to form a paste. Set aside.
  • Using sharp kitchen shears, spatchcock the chicken by cutting down both sides of the backbone and removing it. Discard the backbone. Flip the chicken over and press down firmly between the two breasts, flattening the chicken. (See video demonstration below)
  • Rub the skin side of the chicken with the seasoning paste. Place chicken in the pan or air fryer basket, skin side down.
  • Roast or air fry for 20 minutes, and then flip it over, cooking for an additional 20 to 25 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast and thigh registers 165 F. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

Video

Notes

If you make your own chicken stock, don’t throw the back away. Instead, toss it in a bag and into the freezer for use in your next batch of stock or broth.

One-Pan Wonder – Chicken & Crispy Gnocchi with Spinach (w/Vegan Option)

One-Pan Wonder – Chicken & Crispy Gnocchi with Spinach (w/Vegan Option)

We all need a one-pan wonder from time to time and this one certainly fits the bill. Whether it’s for a special occasion or the middle of the week, this dish is sure to please both the palate and the eye. Note: If you want to make this dish vegetarian or Vegan, you can absolutely skip the bacon, chicken, and cheese by simply swapping in and extra pound of sliced mushrooms. If you do a mushroom medley, it adds a nice complexity to the flavors.

Ingredients

  • 4 slices of bacon
  • 5 oz. sliced mushrooms shiitake, portobella, white button – any mushrooms are fine
  • 1 lb. chicken breast or chicken thighs – bone-in or boneless (if bone-in, cut off bones) cut into chunks
  • 1/4 tsp seasoned salt
  • ground black pepper to taste
  • 1-2 TB Greek oregano & garlic infused olive oil
  • 12 oz package gnocchi if you need gluten-free, be sure to read the package since not all gnocchi is created equal
  • 3 to 4 cups fresh spinach
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup pesto from a jar or homemade – your choice
  • grated Reggiano for topping

Instructions

  • Add bacon to a cold large skillet and cook over medium heat until crispy. Remove to a clean plate, reserving bacon fat in the skillet. Once cooled, crumble or chop the bacon.
  • Turn up the heat medium-high, season chicken with seasoned salt & pepper. Add seasoned chicken and mushrooms to the skillet and cook until chicken is no longer pink in the center. Scoop chicken and mushrooms onto the plate with the bacon.
  • Add enough olive oil to the skillet to equal about 2 TB of fat. Reduce heat to medium and add gnocchi, arranging in a single layer. Saute until bottoms are golden brown and crispy – about 2 to 3 minutes. Stir, and continue to saute another 2 or 3 minutes until gnocchi are tender and golden brown all over.
  • Turn heat down to low, all fresh spinach, chicken, mushrooms, and crumbled bacon to the pan. Cover with a lid and allow spinach to mostly wilt – about 3 minutes. Stir in chicken, bacon, mushrooms, and 1/4 cup pesto, taste and add additional pesto or black pepper if needed. Allow to cook for another minute before removing from heat and plating. Serve immediately with a sprinkle of grated Reggiano.

Scallion Waffles

Scallion Waffles

A little bit sweet and a whole lot of savory, who doesn't love veggie-filled waffles for dinner?! Thank you to our members Daniel Burnette and his wife, Karen Fullenwider, for this delicious recipe.

Ingredients

  • FOR THE WAFFLES:
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup cornstarch
  • ¾ teaspoon fine sea salt plus more as needed
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ cup ice water
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ cup finely chopped kimchi
  • 4 cups finely grated emphasis on finely grated mixed vegetables (carrots, zucchini, bell peppers, kale, whatever you’ve got)
  • 4 scallions cut into 2-inch-long sections and thinly sliced lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil plus more as needed
  • FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE:
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar plus more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger or garlic optional
  • ½ teaspoon sesame oil plus more to taste
  • pinch of granulated sugar

Instructions

  • Prepare the pancakes: In a large bowl, whisk together all-purpose flour, cornstarch, salt and baking powder.
  • In a medium bowl, combine water, egg and kimchi. Whisk kimchi mixture into flour mixture, and whisk until smooth. Fold in vegetables and about three-quarters of the scallions. (Save the rest for garnish.)
  • In a large nonstick waffle iron over medium heat, heat 1 teaspoon oil. Scoop portions of batter into the waffle iron and cook on medium heat.Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and sprinkle with a little more salt. Continue with remaining batter.
  • Before serving, make the dipping sauce: In a small bowl, stir together soy sauce, vinegar, ginger or garlic (if using), sesame oil and sugar. Sprinkle sliced scallion over pancakes, and serve with dipping sauce on the side.

Open House at Maple Grove Church

The Iowa Food Cooperative is excited to announce Maple Grove Church has offered to host our West Des Moines distributions!

What is the Iowa Food Cooperative?
-We are a dedicated group that facilitates connections between Iowa producers of food and Iowa consumers of food (You!).
-We care about the local food community and building relationships between farmers and consumers. We believe it is important to understand how the food that nourishes you is produced. The cooperative supports farmers who use sustainable practices in order to improve our water and soil quality along with supporting ecosystems for our pollinators.

How does the Iowa Food Cooperative work?
-The co-op operates a year-round online farmers’ market. Our members (we have a 6 month free trial membership) place orders online every two weeks; our producers deliver the goods to our main site in Des Moines. From there our volunteers sort orders and pack the goods to go out to our satellite locations. The consumers then pick up their goods at the chosen site.

Visit our open house at Maple Grove Church on Thursday, February 13th from 5P-6:30P to sign-up + learn more about what makes the Iowa Food Cooperative the best source for local food.

Budget-Stretcher Beef & Noodles

Beef & Noodles

Budget-Stretcher Beef & Noodles

Because eating local doesn't need to mean breaking your budget, I present this super easy beef & noodles recipe using local ingredients. Not only is this budget friendly, but it's flavorful and perfect for these chilly winter days!
Servings: 8
Cost: $2.25 per serving

Ingredients

IFC Ingredients:

  • Ground beef: http://bit.ly/GroundBeefIFC
  • Carrots: http://bit.ly/CarrotsIFC
  • Onions: http://bit.ly/OnionsIFC
  • Egg noodles: http://bit.ly/BearCreekIFC
  • Rosemary: http://bit.ly/DriedHerbsIFC

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup of chopped carrots
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/3 cup + 3 TB cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 12 oz dry egg noodles

Instructions

  • In a medium size sauce pan over medium heat, bring beef broth to a low boil. In a small bowl, combine cornstarch with 1/2 cup water. Slowly whisk in the cornstarch slurry followed by the thyme, rosemary, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Reduce heat to low and simmer until the gravy thickens to your desired consistency. Turn off the heat and let the gravy stay warm on the burner.
  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil, and egg noodles and cook until the noodles are cooked through – this will take about 10 – 13 minutes. Begin testing the noodles at the 10 minute mark. Drain and return to the pot. Stir in the gravy followed by the frozen peas. (Note: there is no need to warm the peas, the heat from the noodles will perfectly cook them from frozen.)
  • Steam carrots – there are many ways you can do this, I typically opt for the easy way out and put them in a bowl with plastic wrap and microwave for 2 minutes. Stir into the noodles.
  • Meanwhile, cook the ground beef and onions in a skillet, breaking up the beef, until cooked through. Drain off any grease, and stir into the noodles. Taste and adjust salt and pepper as needed.

Notes

Leftovers can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, or frozen in an air tight container for up to 3 months.

Iowa Food Co-op: Your Year-Round Farmers’ Market Solution

Stop by the Iowa Food Cooperative (IFC) on alternate Thursdays and you will see the “scramble” in action. What’s getting scrambled is the result of hundreds of local food enthusiasts, who create custom food orders on the co-op’s website. Iowa farmer producers deliver a bounty of vegetables, eggs, meat, dairy products, baked goods, sauces and more to fill these orders over a day and a half. The scramble begins at 2 p.m. Thursday when all the deliveries are quickly reorganized so consumer buyers can receive their individual orders as early as 4 p.m.

Ryan Marquadt, IFC general manager, will tell you just how much fun a team of mostly volunteers have on the scramble days. Not only is it a challenge, it supports Iowans who care about where their food comes from and how it’s produced. Located on Franklin Street in the Merle Hay neighborhood of Des Moines, the IFC is in its 11th year of operation. 

As a producer member for over ten years, past board president, and now the general manager since March, Marquadt is well equipped to lead this effort to build a food community.  Along with his wife, Janice, and their two children the Marquadts are 5th generation famers near Van Meter.  In their farm operation, Wild Rose Pastures, they provide pasture raised, chemical-free and antibiotic-free turkeys, broiler chickens, eggs, and grass-fed beef at the IFC on-line store. 

“As farmers markets are ending their season, the IFC continues year-round access to hundreds of food and non-food products directly from Iowa farmers and artisans,” states Marquadt.  He adds, “This is a tremendous opportunity for Iowans to support fellow Iowans in eating quality local foods.”

Facts about the impact of the Iowa Food Cooperative in Iowa:

  • All of our products are sold by producers who have grown, made, or raised each item
  • 1,600 different products are offered for sale
  • The top 4 selling items are eggs, ground beef, yogurt and leafy greens
  • We offer 10 different distribution sites for consumers to pick up their order
  • Over 300 farmer producers and 1400 consumer buyers are members
  • Producers provide profiles that describe their production practices
  • Annually over $400,000 in sales occur at the cooperative
  • 82.5% of the purchase price goes straight to our farmer-owners
  • We have 8 part-time staff and 60 volunteers; both are essential to the success of the cooperative
  • We help protect Iowa’s air, water, soil and wildlife by supporting farming practices that enhance the environment

To become a member or learn more about the Iowa Food Cooperative check our website at https://iowafood.coop/ or contact Ryan Marquadt at ryan@iowafood.coop or 515-978-1034.

Cincinnati Chili

Cincinnati Chili

Let's talk chili, Cincinnati chili, in particular. When I explain this particular chili to folks, I start by saying it's not the reddish, tomato-based Tex-Mex chili they're used to eating; it's best to think of Cincinnati chili as a mole of sorts since it contains both chocolate and cinnamon. Yes, I know that seems like an odd thing to put on spaghetti or hot dogs, but trust your Recipe Lady on this one, it just works and it works well.


How did this strange dish come to be?


The history of Cincinnati Chili – a heart felt story of two Macedonian refugees who fled to America from Argos Orestiko in order to escape the Balkan Wars in 1921: Macedonian immigrant Tom Kiradjieff created Cincinnati chili in 1922. With his brother, John, Kiradjieff opened a small Greek restaurant called the Empress. The restaurant did poorly however, until Kiradjieff started offering a chili made with Middle Eastern spices, which could be served in a variety of ways. He called it his “spaghetti chili.” Kiradjieff’s “five way” was a concoction of a mound of spaghetti topped with chili, chopped onion, kidney beans, and shredded yellow cheese, served with oyster crackers and a side order of hot dogs topped with more shredded cheese.


The 'ways' of the chili:


Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili

Three-way: spaghetti topped with chili and shredded cheddar

Four-way: spaghetti topped with chili, cheese, and chopped onion

Five-way: spaghetti topped with chili, cheese, chopped onion, and beans


For a Cincinnati coney, substitute a hot dog in a bun for the spaghetti



*******************

IFC Ingredients:


Ground beef

Cheddar cheese

Onions

Crushed red pepper

Hot dog buns

Hot dogs

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1/2 TB vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 2 TB chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/8 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 ounce unsweetened chocolate about 1/2 of a square of baker’s chocolate or 3/4 tsp of cocoa powder
  • 1 1/4 cups beef broth
  • 8 oz tomato sauce
  • 1 TB apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes or 1/8 tsp ground cayenne pepper

Toppings:

  • Shredded cheddar cheese
  • Diced onion
  • Cooked kidney beans

For serving: cooked spaghetti or hot dogs

    Instructions

    • In a large saucepan over medium heat, add oil and onions. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 6 minutes.
    • Add beef, breaking up with a wooden spoon. Stirring frequently, cook until browned.
    • Add chili powder, cinnamon, cumin, allspice, cloves, chocolate, beef broth, tomato sauce, cider vinegar, and red pepper. Stir to mix well. Bring to a boil. Add the bay leaf and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.
    • Remove bay leaf and serve over cooked spaghetti with the toppings of your choice, or on hot dogs.

    Notes

    Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 4 days; or, frozen in an airtight container for up to 9 months.